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Boeing rolls-out 10,000th 737


Jon Ostrower
Boeing rolls-out 10,000th 737

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  • Andrew

    Jon, I would love to see YoY numbers since 2015 for the 737 (-7,-8) vs the A320’s not including the A321 count.

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    • Paulo Sergio Martins

      The real action here on the 737 & A320 lines is between the -800 and A320 model jets, and their immediate successors, the MAX 8 and the A320neo. The -800 is the single most successful airliner model airliner, accounting for over half of all 737’s built. We don’t know if history can be a reliable guide of what will happen between the MAX 8 & A320neo, but it certainty looks like two very powerful competitors at each and every sales campaign.

      At this point of the narrowbody re-engining campaigns, it is clear that Boeing expended quite a bit more effort on their upgrade to restore the status quo to where it was on the Next Generation -800 vs A320ceo.

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  • Andrew

    Jon (FYO) or just for fun and congratulations on your blog.
    http://liftndrag.blogspot.com/2018/03/boeing-post-1300-since-september-2012.html

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  • phoenix

    I would’ve liked to have seen WN celebrate this on the livery, even if it’s as simple as WS’ 100th 737NG.

    https://www.jetphotos.com/photo/8885195

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  • Layman

    Is it really something to celebrate? A granny wearing a tank top and pigtails.
    Boeing had and squandered many opportunities to replace the 737 with a modern, more efficient and quieter model, one with greener, simpler manufacturing techniques and also corresponding MRO savings that one finds on the 787 and A350. I suspect that the unions had some role to play as modern composite jets needs different, less labour intensive efforts.
    PS; when I fly, I purposely avoid any 737 and look for a 320 and in the future a CS, due to the cramped seats found in a 737.

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    • Dean Skora

      And… the seats have nothing to do with Boeing. It’s the choice of the respective airline. Blaming Boeing for your seats is like blaming the airline for what your neighbor is wearing. And the cost of your ticket, on average, contains less than $6 towards the cost of the plane: decisions are made by airlines with regards to fleet continuity, cost to operate and repair, service and parts availability, and so forth, with fuel being the #1 factor in your cost. WN, the largest single 737 customer, celebrates that fact and continues to order. You are certainly entitled to dislike the 737s you fly, but your blanket dismissal of them is certainly not reflected in sales or success.

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  • Ramiro Rivero

    Nice to hear again from you, Jon. After Ben Sandiland’s passing out, there were so few references for aviations geeks like me, I’m happy that you are back with a Blog. Missing that time with the Flightblogger.

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  • MikeF

    Agreed, I was an old flightblogger fan as well. Glad to see Jon in his own space again.

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